WOULD YOU BUY THE MONA LISA?

by Ruth Rifka in Buying Art for Love
     


 

 WOULD YOU BUY THE MONA LISA? 

EVEN IF YOU REALLY DON’T DIG IT?

 Lots of people wouldn’t buy the Mona Lisa if it were painted yesterday by some unknown artist. If they could level with you ––without being hooted down–– they would tell you they really don’t  dig it.  Does that mean they shouldn’t be allowed to purchase art without taking a caretaker along? Do they need a financial adviser to sanctify their art purchase?
 
Freedom of religion is pretty well a given, these days,  so how about freedom of art choice?
 

BUYING ART AS INVESTMENT?

For the buyer, acquiring a piece of art should be a real cinch, a total pleasure. You love it. You want it. It’s within your budget. It already has an ideal future home, the perfect spot, that doesn’t clash with your décor.  It expresses who you are. It’s an “Object of Beauty” in your own eyes. Isn’t that enough?

What’s the hoo-ha anyway about acquiring the right kind of art? Art should not be an investment, but a matter of the heart. From my particular,( and yes, prejudiced) perch, love is not for investment purposes. Or for making a fantastic profit in some future turnover .

 

GARAGE-SALE ART DISCOVERIES

THE BIG DREAM: FINDING AN UNEXPECTED ‘VALUABLE’ TREASURE––    

Will discovering a moldering, hideous painting at a garage sale, perhaps some famous artist’s cast-off, make you like it better? Probably not. So you might as well cash it in for the big bucks and buy whatever does something for your psyche.

To my thinking, just as much as the artist should have created the piece with conviction, so should the buyer part with his money the same way.  The buyer should be true to, and trust his own self. Or else hang up gold certificates over the sofa. (Which ultimately, might prove savvier.) 

BACK TO THE WHAT IS ART, ANYWAY? DEPARTMENT

Art should and does mean different things to different people. Vive la différence.  Artists themselves have a problem getting a handle on “What Is Art”.

 

Speaking only for myself, I am always working towards conviction ––what is true. Not being a saint, I am not above painting towards the “art market”.  Except it wouldn’t work in my case. Honesty of expression is my gig.

 

MY CRITERION ON WHETHER MY  OWN PAINTING IS ANY GOOD–––

 

The painting on the easel must surprise me and I  I feel that could never duplicate it again. It begins to be dear to me, another offspring, so to speak.  And I would prefer to part with it on a one to one basis with someone simpatico to me.

 

This is my take (one of several) on the Mona Lisa: 
 

“MONA LISA, JAZZED UP”   OIL/CANVAS/  40″ X 60″ DIPTYCH

A reversible diptych 40 inches high,  60 inches wide. Oil on canvas. Since the sides can be alternated, it becomes 2 paintings in one, and a bit of a conversation piece.
 
 
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PayPal may be the greatest innovation for commerce, but ideally, I would rather sell my work to a real live person visiting me in my studio, or, at least, by phone contact.  If you would like to see  any paintings displayed on www.ruthrifka.com offline (plus  other work, as yet un-photographed), I welcome you to visit me in my home studio, or discuss any painting on my website (www.ruthrifka.com),  by e-mail (ruthrifka1@gmail.com)  or by phone (561-368-1127).

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 ruthrifka1@gmail.com
 
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